December 7, 2021

Uber Turco News

Breaking News, Sports, Entertainment

England’s champagne backline without Tuilagi or Farrell is a sign of things to come after South Africa win

England’s champagne backline without Tuilagi or Farrell is a sign of things to come after South Africa win
Three superb tries by England showcased the attacking talent in the red-rose backline, and when put together with a 27-26 win over the world champions South Africa, it was difficult to imagine any greater thrill with which to round off the autumn at Twickenham.

There were mixed feelings when Manu Tuilagi slid into the corner to finish a statement opening try on the end of England obdurately taking a re-scrum and a line-out to lay the gauntlet down to the South Africa pack.

The big centre limped off immediately afterwards, putting his hand to his hamstring, and with the captain Owen Farrell already absent through injury, it left England regrouping and reshaping around the twin playmakers Marcus Smith and Henry Slade – and what a fine job they made of it.

South Africa play in a certain way to get a result. Bludgeon, harass, kick and bludgeon some more.

    <figure class="inews__shortcode-readmore">
    <div class="inews__shortcode-readmore__image">
    <img src="https://i.inews.co.uk/content/uploads/2021/11/PRI_210826881-155x155.jpg" height="84" width="84" alt="Read More - Featured Image">
    </div>
    <div class="inews__shortcode-readmore__text">
    <h4>Read More</h4>
    <a href="https://inews.co.uk/sport/rugby-union/kyle-sinckler-england-prop-lions-tour-springboks-the-beast-tendai-mtawarira-interview-1307102">‘Kyle Sinckler let himself down on the Lions tour’: Springboks legend ‘The Beast’ dissects England prop’s game</a>
    </div>
    </figure>

Nothing wrong with that, and the Springboks may feel they did enough to win by forcing a stream of England errors either side of half-time. Missed kicks at goal and a try held up by Max Malins under Kwagga Smith cost the Boks at least 13 points.

But England’s winning way was dazzling and if this was your first taste of Test rugby, you would rush back to Twickenham to see more of this.

The second England try was a thing of simple beauty and conception – so a nod to new attack coach Martin Gleeson – and excellent execution.

Slade was the first receiver from scrum on the left-hand side, with fly-half Smith “used by not using him” as the old football commentary goes. A decoy runner, the modern tactician might call him.

With nice spacing between Slade, Freddie Steward and Max Malins to quickly spread the play, England outflanked the famed Boks defence, and then good footwork and forward thrust by Malins and the scorer Steward rounded it off.

    <figure class="inews__shortcode-readmore">
    <div class="inews__shortcode-readmore__image">
    <img src="https://i.inews.co.uk/content/uploads/2021/11/PRI_207405243-155x155.jpg" height="84" width="84" alt="Read More - Featured Image">
    </div>
    <div class="inews__shortcode-readmore__text">
    <h4>Read More</h4>
    <a href="https://inews.co.uk/sport/rugby-union/england-rugby-coaches-eddie-jones-assistants-team-2023-world-cup-1293873">England rugby coaches: All the key figures in Eddie Jones’ assistants team ahead of Rugby World Cup 2023</a>
    </div>
    </figure>

South Africa’s great wing threat Makazole Mapimpi was by contrast forced to chase his side’s kicks or take poor passes, until he finally was on the end of a good one in the dramatic final quarter.

But that came after England’s crucial third try – crucial because they had been engaged in a full-on struggle to hold the South African momentum.

Again Smith lay deep off a line-out taken by Courtney Lawes at the front to get the Boks guessing, and Joe Marchant was launched through the middle like a cork from a champagne bottle, with the 20-year-old scrum-half Raffi Quirke on his shoulder for an exultant run-in.

Champagne rugby it was by England, and at the end of an up and down 2021 for both these countries, a victory for positivity.


The likes of Joe Marchant, Freddie Steward and Marcus Smith came of age to beat the world champions at Twickenham and suggest the England revolution will be televised and eminently watchable