December 5, 2021

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Houston residents accuse at least 12 cancer deaths in a toxic railroad yard

Michael Regan, EPA’s administrator, has promised to take action at a toxic depot in northern Houston, saying locals are increasing the incidence of cancer and killing children.

For years, people living in District 5 of the city have expressed concern about the site of a former timber processing facility owned by the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR).

State survey Shows that the incidence of childhood leukemia is “significantly higher” than the average in states near the site, and a local mother killed her 13-year-old son Corinthian Giles, whose carcinogenic toxin died of leukemia this year. He said he believed in it.

“He just wanted to make sure the doctor did everything he could to save his life,” said La Tonya Payne, who shed tears. CBS News..

“Until the last breath, he fought, and he fought.”

Payne is one of a group of frustrated residents demanding action in the field, and on Friday the issue caught the attention of the EPA Boss Regan, who toured the area as part of his “Journey of Justice” initiative. I did.

LaTonya Payne told CBS News that she believed that the carcinogenic toxin killed her son.

LaTonya Payne said CBS News She believes the carcinogenic toxin killed her son

Payne's 13-year-old son Corinthian Giles died of leukemia this year

Payne's 13-year-old son Corinthian Giles died of leukemia this year

Payne’s 13-year-old son Corinthian Giles died of leukemia this year

Corinthian Giles, who lived near the railroad, died of leukemia in July at the age of 13.

Corinthian Giles, who lived near the railroad, died of leukemia in July at the age of 13.

Corinthian Giles, who lived near the railroad, died of leukemia in July at the age of 13.

“We have a sense of urgency to clear this turmoil,” he told CBS News. “I don’t think we were positive enough about the state-federal reaction.”

Sandra Edwards, a resident of District 5, said the cancer killed at least 12 people on her streets-including her dad.

“We’ve been fighting this threat for four or five years, but no one came,” Edwards told CBS. “Everyone wants to come see what’s going on, but nothing has been done.”

The Texas Department of Health and Human Services has found an increase in the number of chemical-related cancers of concern at the UPRR site.

In a letter to the EPA in June, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner urged federal agencies to assist in investigating the health and environmental impact of pollution on the site.

He also called for “meaningful relief” for the affected population of the site, including the possibility of relocation.

“This issue is of paramount importance to the city and deserves all the resources the EPA can devote to it,” Turner said. letter To Regan.

In a letter in October, UPPR responded to the EPA’s letter by promising to continue open and transparent dialogue with affected residents.

Houston citizens in District 5 of the city have expressed concern about the former timber treatment plant where soil and groundwater were contaminated with creosote during historic operations.

Houston citizens in District 5 of the city have expressed concern about the former timber treatment plant where soil and groundwater were contaminated with creosote during historic operations.

Houston citizens who live in the 5th district of the city grew up concern About a former timber treatment plant where soil and groundwater were contaminated with creosote during a historic operation

Residents say they believe that pollution has spread beyond neighboring areas

Residents say they believe that pollution has spread beyond neighboring areas

Residents say they believe that pollution has spread beyond neighboring areas

Michael Regan, Head of the Environmental Protection Agency, promised to take action by saying:

Michael Regan, Head of the Environmental Protection Agency, promised to take action by saying:

Michael Regan, Head of the Environmental Protection Agency, promised to take action by saying:

He said he had acquired the former Houston Timber Preservation Site in 1997 after the operation was shut down, adding that he had never processed the timber there, but carried out a “massive cleanup of historical impact.”

Cleanup has been underway in the field for over 30 years and UPRR has added to the letter to the EPA.

“So far, test results have not shown affected soil or groundwater exposure to the population,” he said.

Locals say they believe that pollution has spread beyond neighboring areas.

Those who lost their loved ones to cancer said they hope Regan can help improve to prevent further tragedy.

“Every day, to be honest, it’s hard,” Payne said of his deceased son. “We are all struggling to have to live without him.”

Houston residents accuse at least 12 cancer deaths in a toxic railroad yard

Source link Houston residents accuse at least 12 cancer deaths in a toxic railroad yard

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