December 7, 2021

Uber Turco News

Breaking News, Sports, Entertainment

Why is TV Rusty Lee helping his son with a CashFX currency scam?

Tony Hetherington, Sunday’s ace investigator Financial Mail, fought the reader’s corner, uncovered the truth behind the closed room, and won the victory of those left behind at his own expense. Find out how to contact him below.

JH writes: Have you ever seen James Leeds, the son of TV chef and personality Rustie Lee, a giant promoter of CashFX scams?

Delays in withdrawals from CashFX began in May and are gradually worsening.

Currently, the delay is 8 or 9 weeks, and members are awakened to the fact that this is a scam and things are not right.

Support: TV celebrity Rusty Lee and son James Leeds

Support: TV celebrity Rusty Lee and son James Leeds

Tony Hetherington’s reply: CASHFX is an illegal Forex trading scheme based in Panama, but its tentacles are spreading all over the world. More than 20 countries and financial regulators have issued public warnings to them, including our own Financial Conduct Authority.

It pretends to be an educational business and sells training manuals on “forex” transactions, but with a nod and wink, the promoter convinces new hires that they don’t have to learn anything. Real money is even more if you employ all your friends and family in your plans, and is made simply by investing a lump sum. Rusty Lee has appeared on numerous television shows for many years. Recently, her son James (and yes, he has an “S” at the end of his name, but she doesn’t) joined her at the Million Pond Motorhome on Channel 5, And he is a prolific and glamorous person in online video. But is James telling the truth?

In an online announcement about CashFX, he claims, “We will be FCA regulated.” This is so wrong that I can laugh.

The FCA states: ‘This company is not endorsed by us and is intended for people in the UK. They never access the Financial Ombudsman Service or are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), so they rarely get their money back in the event of a problem.

Of course, just selling a training manual does not require approval. So is James Lees based on a secure legal basis? No, it’s not.

In one presentation he told the victim that he lost money when he tried forex trading himself, but now he relies on CashFX. You have an expert exchange for you.

I asked both James and his mother Rusty to comment on this illegal activity. James crushed it, but Rusty suggested that she needed her “celebrity” status to attract readers.

She added that there was no link to CashFX and explained:

Her husband and business partner Andreas Hohmann also called out and said it was “disgusting” to approach Rusty in a question.

He threatened:

He later went back very slightly, saying he advised James to stay away from CashFX.

So how private is the online chat between Rusty Lee and her son? Not at all because he is posting them to show to the world.

Along with one promotional video, he announces that “profit is better than wages” and provides a link to his personal CashFX adoption website.

And in the video itself, Rusty Lee tells him how proud she is:’You are my son, you are not a trickster. You are honest, and if it isn’t right you won’t do it, so good luck to you and good luck to the people you care for.

Private chat between mother and son? It’s unlikely. After that, James posted a message: “Wow, 1.5k view, thanks to Rusty Lee.”

The frank fact is that James Leeds is soliciting victims for illegal investment plans, which I warned again last year and earlier this year.

Why do you repeatedly warn? The FCA is a failed watchdog, because it sees notifications on the website as if they were real actions.

It is devoting “awakened” energy to telling financial companies how they need more gender diversity and how to respond to climate change. In the meantime, it has long abandoned the idea of ​​authorizing fraudsters and protecting victims of fraud without proper checking.

I asked the FCA for comment today, but after saying I would think about it, the regulator decided to go back to sleep instead. When will the MP and Treasury Select Committee wake up?

Why is it so burdensome to calculate taxes?

JS wrote: HM Revenue and Customs has informed me that a refund of £ 199 of the tax paid on the PPI claim is required.

The company that represented me, PPI Tax Advisory, says he has never received a check from HM Revenue and Customs.

Seven phone calls and six letters to tax officials couldn’t solve the mystery, and the claim company washed it away. Can HM Revenue and Customs certainly track whether a check is in a bank?

Refund: HM Revenue and Customs has redone the amount and came up with a £ 150 refund.

Refund: HM Revenue and Customs has redone the amount and came up with a £ 150 refund.

Refund: HM Revenue and Customs has redone the amount and came up with a £ 150 refund.

Tony Hetherington’s reply: Oddly enough, you received a second letter from the tax office shortly after you contacted me.

Senior staff at Revenue Customs Headquarters were needed to explain what happened. Your agent has filed a claim covering the three years from 2016 to 2019, but you have already self-reported and received a refund for one of those years.

When Revenue & Customs sent a £ 199 refund, the checkout wasn’t done correctly and I had to reissue the payment, but I couldn’t record this. Staff recalculated the refund and sent £ 45.

But then they found that the previous agent who acted for you also made a mistake and now leaves you £ 151 tax and no refunds. All of these conclusions are that HM Revenue and Customs has redone the total and a refund of £ 150 has been sent to PPI Tax Advisory. A revenue spokesperson said: “We apologize for the inconvenience. We have corrected Mr. S’s record.”

The tax collector also sent you £ 75 in compensation. I asked PPI Tax Advisory for comment, and I ended up sending £ 147, but I didn’t get a reply. This is a tax refund minus fees. Who says calculating your tax is not taxable?

The virgin was called by a debt collector

PL writing: I switched from Virgin Media to BT. I had already paid Virgin in advance and received a mobile phone refund, but there was nothing in the landline and broadband packages. After that, Virgin raised another £ 72 from our bank account.

At the Right Wavelength: Tony asked Virgin to stop debt collection while summarizing its actions, and it did.

At the Right Wavelength: Tony asked Virgin to stop debt collection while summarizing its actions, and it did.

At the Right Wavelength: Tony asked Virgin to stop debt collection while summarizing its actions, and it did.

Tony Hetherington’s reply: When I contacted Virgin, the staff apologized and said they would sort it out, but instead of repayment, you told me that you received a letter from the debt collector saying you had more debt. I asked Virgin to stop debt collection while summarizing the action, and it did.

Virgin Media said: “We apologize to Mr. L for the pain caused.” We issue a £ 101 check to refund the money we accidentally received and remove the outstanding balance in his account. . “

If you believe you are a victim of financial misconduct, contact Tony Hetherington (Financial Mail, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5TS) or send an email to tony.hetherington @ mailonsunday.co.uk. please. Due to the large number of inquiries, we cannot provide personal answers. We are sorry, but please send only a copy of the original.

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. Clicking on them may incur a small fee. This will help fund This Is Money and make it freely available. I haven’t written an article promoting the product. We do not allow commercial relationships to affect editorial independence.

Why is TV Rusty Lee helping his son with a CashFX currency scam?

Source link Why is TV Rusty Lee helping his son with a CashFX currency scam?

The post Why is TV Rusty Lee helping his son with a CashFX currency scam? appeared first on Eminetra.co.uk.